Professor Annapurna Poduri

Professor Anna Poduri

Anna PoduriProfessor Annapurna Poduri is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Associate in Neurology at the Epilepsy Genetic Program, Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr.  Poduri received her BA in Biology from Harvard University, her MD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.  She completed her pediatric training at Boston Children’s Hospital, child neurology residency at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and returned to Boston for a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology at Boston Children’s Hospital.  She went on to pursue training in neurogenetics in the clinic and through a post-doctoral fellowship with Dr. Christopher Walsh.  Dr. Poduri began her independent research program at Boston Children’s Hospital in 2013 focusing on the genetics of epilepsy.  She has been awarded the prestigious Dreifuss-Penry Epilepsy Award from the American Academy of Neurology and the Derek Denny-Brown Young Neurological Scholar Award from the American Neurological Association in 2015.

Professor Poduri’s profile page from Boston Children’s Hospital

Topic for Genetic Epilepsy Conference 2018:

Precision Medicine for Genetic Epilepsy – Small Steps Toward a Big Vision

As the keynote speaker, Anna will review a modern vision of precision medicine for epilepsy. After a brief review of epilepsy genetics, she will discuss a framework for precision medicine in epilepsy that thrives on partnerships among physicians, researchers, and parent-led organizations. Some of the key issues to consider include identifying clinical endpoints, the choice of models in the laboratory setting, and the clinical systems in which we will try to implement novel, precision therapies. The talk will attempt to combine aspirational and practical issues, challenging the status quo but also being realistic about what we still need to accomplish to work toward precision medicine.

The Genetic Epilepsy Conference 2018 was Supported by:

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